Saturday, July 08, 2006


I picked the first jonquils out of the garden today. Since I don't have a digital camera here is my effort with the photobooth on the computer!

Writing this talk about ceramics and decoration for the National Conference has turned out to be an interesting exercise. Writing about what I like in other artists work has made me go back and reconsider what I'd like my own work to be. This week (in the spare seconds) I've been thinking about how to strengthen the intent of my bowls, how to integrate the line and composition into the work.

Every so often it's good to deconstruct what you are making as if you are a total stranger- it helps to see new things, appreciate the strenghts and think about the weakenesses.

4 comments:

Florence said...

I thought it was interesting that Fiona Hisock creates the vessel to reflect the plant she uses, so that there is a sympathy between the vessel and the nature of the plant itself.

The two become one, beyond decoration.

It is difficult to see our own work with a distant eye, that's why it is said that time will tell.

we can only try and in the effort perfect our work.
xxff

June Cullen said...

Since becoming the owner of some of your work I've been prompted to look more closely at the work of Clarice Cliff. Her work has a very strong botanical influence with a line and composition that is very distinctive. Jonquil, cabbage flower, passionfruit, crocus, nasturtium are but a few from the garden that inform her design and composition. Even her abstract designs compliment the botanical. I know she is of a different time and place but nonetheless I find it interesting that your work has prompted me to look back at hers with another eye.

Mad said...

Hi Shannon- Nice blog! I am also a potter with a blog and have a links column for other blogging potters. Would you mind if I linked you to mine? ps- Diana Fayt sent me your way-
http://davistudio.blogspot.com
mad.maryanne(at)gmail.com

shannon said...

June,
I'm so glad that owning carft has prompted you to explore the historical connections in ceramics- who knows what strange paths and byways handmade objects can lead you down?